Twilight of the Donds…

living deadThere aren’t so many of us any more. We don’t know how much time we’ve got. We’re not quite the only ones left; occasional contact from people like Swawilg or Panthersan shows that there are other isolated groups across the globe, probably holed up in similar places to us – defensible position, source of fresh water, good view across the surrounding countryside, but not too obvious. But it’s a while since we’ve heard from Nilpferd or Maki, Ravi or Deano. The lights are gradually going out… And we know that, sooner or later, they’ll be coming for us too, and we won’t be able to hold them off.

For the last six weeks, or however long it’s been, we’ve been too caught up in day to day events, first dealing with the sheer shock of the world falling to pieces, then desperately scrambling for any means of survival; no time or energy to think about anything else. But things have been quiet recently – a pause in the relentless hostilities, enough for some people to start feeling just a little bit of hope that we might make it through, and even for us pessimists to conclude that we could afford to let down our guard slightly and try to relax. “It’s time,” said Darcey’sDad. AliM and Barbryn, who’d kept the Spill ticking over even in the darkest days, agreed. The Prof, who had all the data, muttered something about Zeno’s tortoise and that so long as the ceremony was always taking place tomorrow and never today, RR could never actually come to an end – but TinCanMan and SOWC sat on his head until he agreed. Ladies, gentlemen and the terrifying zombie hordes of the Guardian management, we present: the Spill Awards 2015. Continue reading

Gqom

I’m a sucker for a new sub genre, the more unpronounceable the better, so was thrilled to come across something called Gqom this week – apparently it represents “da sound u get wen u drop a rock on tiles”.

At first I was surprised that something that seems so Western and cutting edge like bass music/dupstep/electronica could find a voice in the poor South African townships of Durban, but the more I thought about it, the more it made sense that a music that started out being made on Playstations by 15-year old black kids in deprived London tower blocks should resonate with 15-year old South African black kids in deprived Durban townships, especially when held against the college kid centred fratboyisms that twisted the urban grime of bass music into safe and inoffensive stadium-glo-stick-waving US EDM.

OK, enough rambling, here’s the lead track on a compilation album documenting the scene. The African musical influences are more than apparent and it stretches the genre in any number of new directions.

 

Listen to (and then buy!) the whole thing here and read all about the album and the scene.

Spillyear 1979

Still, the music was good.

We’re running out of years… But we haven’t done 1979 yet. I was  1 year old. Pity, coz I reckon it would have been fun to be a teenager.

Listen to the playlist here

Try this link too if YouTube is being temperamental:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSM6V5dN78_ABLPCFrJ9XQ6cD-GzHllDx&jct=p6Nrili_lfuOEVr70RiTMDRcqpYy3w

 

 

 

Mohan Veena – by Ravi Raman

I stumbled across a lo-o-ong performance by Vishwa Mohan Bhatt on an instrument that is so complicated you have to read about it or see it to believe it. A guitar with 20 strings! I’m not kidding … called a Mohan Veena it is one of Vishwa’s own design and a spin-off on an older Indian instrument. You can see him playing the instrument above,  but I’m sending the 19 minute track called “Raag Basant” to Ali, coz it ain’t exactly Earworms material, though it’s still interesting enough for a share. Let me know if you all like it, it’s in the RR Dropbox folder. Read about the veena here: http://www.vishwamohanbhatt.com/veena.htm.