‘Spillyear 1988

At the end of last week’s hugely enjoyable thread Fuel posted a link to a Guardian article that contained the line “1995 sits with 1967, 1977 and 1988 among pop culture’s true glory years”.

I’m sure the Guardian doesn’t go in for phone hacking, but I’m a little put out that I appear to have had my head hacked.

1988 it is (we’ll come to 1977) though there is some confusion about whether the “Second Summer of Love” was 1988 or 1989. Wikipedia hedges its bets:

The Second Summer of Love is a name given to the period in 1988–89 in Britain, during the rise of acid house music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed MDMA-fuelled rave parties.The term generally refers to the summers of both 1988 and 1989 when electronic dance music and the prevalence of the drug MDMA fuelled an explosion in youth culture culminating in mass free parties and the era of the rave. LSD was also widely available and popular again. The music of this era fused dance beats with a psychedelic, 1960s flavour, and the dance culture drew parallels with the hedonism and freedom of the Summer of Love in San Francisco two decades earlier. Similarities with the Sixties included fashions such as Tie-dye. The smiley logo is synonymous with this period in the UK.

I have vague memories of repetitive beats coming from the hill a couple of miles away from our house, and smiley stickers made it as far as my primary school. But I also remember the charts: this was a time when Rick Astley was not an ironic internet meme, but a popular recording artist. Ye gods.

So, ‘Spillers: were you leaving an important part of your brain somewhere in a field in Hampshire, swallowing Stock, Aitken and Waterman, or celebrating the twilight of hair metal? Or none of the above?

Listen to the playlist here 

Add your top 3 here

 

Spillyear 1995

 

 

 

 

I think we established last week that 1967 was a pretty good year for music. So some of you had the Summer of Love. My generation? We had Britpop.

Yes, OK, maybe it doesn’t quite compare, but it was, in the immortal words, or word, of Supergrass, alright. The sort of music I liked was suddenly in the charts, on daytime radio, in the media. It was a good time to be 17.

The zenith was 20 years ago this weekend, when Pulp conquered Glastonbury. I was there (my first and, to date, only Glastonbury). It felt, however briefly, like we were part of something important. Like this was the way the future was meant to feel.

Or just 20,000 people standing in a field.

But of course, there was more to 1995 than Britpop. What were you listening to?

Listen to the playlist here

Add your top 3 songs here

 

 

Spillyear 1967

One of the downsides of living in a tropical country is that, because it’s always summer, it’s never really summer.

To celebrate the summer solstice, let’s head back to the Summer of Love. Although hate-filled wintry tunes and songs of autumnal indifference from 1967 are welcome too.

Obviously an astonishing time for music. Were you there? Are you sure? How on earth are you going to pick a top 3?

Listen to the playlist here

Add your tracks here

Spillyear 2005

Tomorrow is my 10th wedding anniversary. We didn’t have any recorded music at the ceremony, since it was on a beach, although later in the evening a friend sang “The Book of Love” by the Magnetic Fields – a song I’d never heard before, but which led me to a deep and enduring love that doesn’t grow old… yes, 69 Love Songs is a wonderful album. What? Oh yes, the other’s been alright too.

So, staying with years ending in 5, let’s rewind to 10 years ago… 2005 was also the year RR began (I didn’t start playing till the following autumn) and the year YouTube was founded. All in all, a pretty life-changing year.

But what did 2005 mean to you?

Listen to the playlist

Add your top 3 tracks here

 

Spillyear 1975

 

The 1975

A band called The 1975 quit social media for a day, and have now come back. Apparently this counts as news. I’m not sure anyone born before 1975 cares. Or 1995, comes to that.

So yeah, anyway. 1975. Good year for music? I think so, though I wasn’t there.

1965 looks hard to beat – have we reached a high-water mark already? But let’s hear what things sounded like 10 years later. 

Listen to the playlist here

[it’s supposed to embed, but doesn’t seem to work – technical support welcome]

Add your top 3 here

 

 

Spillyear 1965

Is it Tuesday already? This challenge is making my life go by too fast.

I’ve been unsure about how far back in time we should go with this. Hearing people’s reminiscences has been every bit as fun as listening to the music, and the further back we go, the fewer of these there’ll be. There’s also the danger that we’ll end up with more of a canonical “best of” list, and fewer personal choices and offbeat discoveries.

But let’s give it a try, and see how it works.

1965. Half a century ago. The year that popular music began to change from light entertainment to the most vibrant contemporary art form? Maybe.

If you were there, tell us about it.

If you weren’t – well, imagine you were…

 

Listen to the playlist here

Add your top three tracks here

Spillyear 1992

1992

I really enjoyed last week’s 1984 love-in. It was clearly a time when pop music was all shiny and new for a large slice of the ‘Spill demographic. For me, that came a few years later. By the early 90s, I was spending all my paper-round money at Our Price (or sometimes in the independent record shop where you could buy second hand cassettes for around £3.99, which seems absurdly expensive now) and the Melody Maker albums of the year list was a hallowed religious text.

So what were your top 3 records of 1992?

Listen to the playlist here

Add your choices