Webcore on Japanese TV

Webcore was kind enough to send Mrs Maki and me the DVD of his family’s appearance on a Japanese TV programme. We thought the rest of you would like to see it. Here it is with an introduction from the man himself:

Back in April this year a Japanese TV company asked me if I would play a Beatles’ song by the River Mersey, discuss Irish immigration to Liverpool, including any Beatles Irish connections, and indulge them in several other other sketches and vignettes, including going to my house, meeting my family, and singing Galway Bay for the population of Japan.
They turned out to be fantastic people; the lovely and extremely personable presenter, Yuuke, whom I hadn’t met before she approached me on camera; the director and crew; and especially Jim, the fighting-fit 66-year-old Oxbridge gent co-ordinator who got me the gig, fluent in Japanese, looking like a movie star, wowing the women like a clean-shaven Robert Redford.
I don’t play Beatles’ songs, I told them, and I’m certainly not going to play Galway Bay – my grandmother sang that one.
Then they told me how much I would be paid. Erm, I’m prepared to compromise, I said: I choose the Beatles’ song, and you film me reading Galway Bay off my laptop so that it’s obvious I wouldn’t normally play it.
As part of a 90-minute programme, a fourteen-hour day’s filming was edited down to 10 minutes.
As the day went on I was attempting to edit the filming in my mind, knowing that they couldn’t fit it all in to a TV programme, and I knew that it was the director’s job to create a coherent cut from a mass of material.

I was sorta unsurprised at what was included in our ten minutes. Leza had written the song only the week before, and Kevin had learned the guitar part only the night before.

I’d just like to say that MAKINAVAJA volunteered to organise and arrange this post for me. I couldn’t have managed it. So a big public thank you to him for being a gentleman and a scholar.

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74 thoughts on “Webcore on Japanese TV

    • Thanks Mitch, maybe one day you make that Liverpool trip. There’s far more going on here than The Bootles.

  1. Ahhh…not a dry eye in the house! Such a sweet film, webcore – and it’s an honour to meet you and your family (sort of).

    And thanks, Maki, for posting it!

  2. Great video george. Loved it. That’s one wonderful thing to leave for the family album.
    I suppose that elevates you to superstar status in Japan and the far east…………
    When is the tour starting ?
    And if you ever need an agent………..well you know where I am.

    • Hi Peter, and thanks. Having seen the steely look in your eye when I was about to taste my Derbyshire porter, then heard you say, “That needs to settle, lad.”
      You’d be my first choice agent.

  3. loved it – then had this weird feeling I meet you – but remembered the film of you playing at the allotment that’s been posted before – how odd is this knowing people by internet ?

    • Thanks Shane, my mother is 80 and has online friends. ‘Twas here my local telephone exchange crashed. I’m in the library now.

  4. Thanks for sharing this. Out in public right now, so only able to grab a quick peek with the sound off. There’s a genuine charm about the whole piece that does credit to all involved.

    Any chance of a subtitled version (those Scouse accents can be pretty tricky, when you haven’t listened to one in a while)?

  5. You look EXACTLY like your fuzzy RR social photos! How amazing is that! Jokes aside, it was a lovely vignette of Chez Webcore. The only thing lacking is a transcript of the Japanese voice-over. I wonder who might be able to….???

    On a completely separate matter, did anyone else hear the bit where he’s walking along and saying “…and she likes YUI” so we know he’s telling the presenter about Sakura.

    You look great, Webcore, and you have such a lovely and talented family. Great dogs too. I was teary-eyed over your lab. Very disappointed not to see something bubbling away on the stove, though. Glad to see you at last.

    Well done Maki for posting this.

  6. George; Wonderful piece, I really enjoyed seeing you in your environs plus all the family. Pier Head looks a bit different these days. Again more congrats plus thanks to Maki for the tech support.

    • Hi Tony, Thanks a lot. The Pier Head and the Albert Dock are linked by a wide riverside walkway now, with the spiffing new Museum Of Liverpool in between. It’s full of tourists from all over the world, 12 months of the year. Thanks and see you.

  7. Oh George! ! !

    This is wonderful ! ! ! I just woke up and look at The Spill and what a really really wonderful surprise ! ! !

    I cried all for the complete first time I watched it so I missed it first time, but I have watched like four times and it just so great ! ! !

    I think for most of it you can understand what is being asked or said from the answers except maybe at the end.

    The part after the song that your beautiful daughter sings is very moving. She says:

    Sogoi ! ! ! – kanou shimashita ! ! ! kireina ! ! !

    Which means:

    Wonderful ! ! ! I was really moved ! ! ! It was beautiful ! ! !

    And I think you can see that she is very genuine and really moved ! ! !

    During the part at the very end of the video where she is beings talking at the very end of the scene in your home and continues talking while walking in the street, she says:

    Liverpool has a long history as a port town and the people suffered very much, but making music is part of the people, music reached the people, the music , will stay in my heart.

    Oh WOW ! ! ! George ! ! ! You and your family are so great ! ! ! I admire you even more now ! ! !

    Thank you Maki for making this wonderful post possible ! ! !

    • Ah Sakura, I would have replied to you this morning but my local telephone exchange crashed. I’m in the public library right now. Spottedrichard was right. I was telling Yuuke that I have a friend in Tokyo, I told her that your name was Sakura, and that we are members of the world’s finest music blog. I was telling her your musical preferences at the point where I said ” . . . she likes YUI.”
      Yuuke smiled and said, “Ah, YUI, yes.”
      Many Japanese tourists all over Liverpool said “Hello” to her – in English! She just looked shy and half-smiled and turned away.
      I asked, “Are you famous in Japan?”
      She held out her hand backside up and gently waggled it from side to side as if to say, ‘maybe’. I can vouch for her, she was consistently adorable.
      Thank you for the translation, we were intrigued about that.
      And thanks for a lovely post, Georgie san.

      • Hi George ! ! !

        I definitely recognise her and she is definitely well know, but I can not remember the family name and they do not say it in the video. But I will remember soon I am sure.

        I am so pleased you had a good experience with them, she is a very nice and genuine person I think you can see that in the video. I think they must have enjoyed it a lot also ! ! !

        Did she say “ma- ma” when did the think with the hand – this would mean something like “not really” but it is just being modest and really means “yes but I do not want to boast” ! ! !

        I am so happy for you ! ! !

  8. It was great. Very moving and genuine. I’ve only been to Liverpool once and I still felt nostalgic for the place watching this. Want to go back soonest.

    • Thank you Steve. That means a lot to me. I’ve always loved the city, even at its lowest ebb, but nowadays its pulsating. I’m really proud of it.

  9. What a super video! Your daughter has a lovely voice. Thank you for sharing it with us (and to Maki for posting). And I have met you, so that’s my claim to fame, now!

  10. Now you’re big in Japan too ! I’m sure I’m not the only one feeling a warm glow of pride seeing that, webby ! And what a gorgeous voice your daughter has too !

  11. Excellent. What a pleasure to ‘meet’ your family, George. Your kids make lovely music (not that you don’t but, as you say, neither song was your choice).

    And thanks, maki, for showing it to us.

    • Hi Chris, it’s true, the kids made me look bad. I have a high voice with a range from baritone to falsetto, though I’m most comfortable doing a growly gruff rock like Waits, Earle or Dr. John. Those two songs were bland and monotonous. Still, goal achieved.

  12. Only possible criticism would be the title of the post. You might be tuning in expecting someone to say (in a Liverpud accent, natch), “I particularly enjoyed the moment when the young fellah fell off the slippery slide.”

  13. Reallly lovely that they made your family the centre of the film. Particularly enjoyed the personal history and the story of your grandmother and grandfather. There’s a clear sense of looking after others and taking in waifs and strays running through the family. Cheers.

    • Hi Fuel, the director was most interested in Irish immigration, and as we know, the Japanese revere their ancestors, so they were keen to find out those details, and it was a pleasure to impart them. Thanks for the kind words, too.

  14. That was great and the presenter was right, your daughter does indeed have a beautiful voice……loved the family story too…..great stuff!

    • Thank you panther, well, you of all people should know why they were interested in all the family details. See you.

  15. What a wonderful collective reaction. Thanks to all of you. I’m going to go back now and answer any posts that require a response. See you all in a bit, and thanks again.

  16. I mean’t to say that that photo of your dad looks great.
    He looks like he should be sitting on a porch in Mississippi in the 30s.
    Nice looking guitar too.

    • UBU! He’s the guy at whose knee I first heard the songs of Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams, Fats Domino, Muddy Waters and Ray Charles. In fact, I thought he WAS Ray Charles.

  17. Very enjoyable and interesting meeting of cultures, webcore!

    I might be able to fill in some detail on McCartney’s Irish antecedents. I believe his grandfather was from Castleblayney in County Monaghan, a few miles from my hometown and there are still some family members living in the arera. The town is nicknamed Nashville in Ireland because it was home to the showband and country & western scene. When Macca married Heather Mills in nearby Glaslough there were some grumblings amongst the Irish wing at the lack of invites for what were really some distant cousins.

    Thanks to maki for bringing this to the net.

  18. Very enjoyable and interesting meeting of cultures, webcore!

    I might be able to fill in some detail on McCartney’s Irish antecedents. I believe his grandfather was from Castleblayney in County Monaghan, a few miles from my hometown and there are still some family members living in the area. The town is nicknamed Nashville in Ireland because it was home to the showband and country & western scene. When Macca married Heather Mills in nearby Glaslough there were some grumblings amongst the Irish wing at the lack of invites for what were really some distant cousins.

    Thanks to maki for bringing this to the net.

    • LLAMA, Thanks for the extra info, wish I’d known it at the time. Speaking of which, running out. Must dash. Thanks.

  19. “There are places I remember
    All my life, though some have changed
    Some forever, not for better
    Some have gone and some remain…”

    Glad that there are still scholars and gents out there, and glad that one of them shares his wisdom with us. Watching this has made my morning.

  20. Really enjoyed the talent show! Hopefully we will eventually meet in real life at an RR social, despite the North-South divide! We have enough musical talent in our midst to run an RR Festival, and I’m sure you would top the bill…

  21. That’s brilliant, I’m so impressed how the telly people allowed that to flow and captured that lovely moment. Thanks George and Andrew !

  22. Great and insightful entertainment; explaining it all to Italian pals while stranded in a fab hotel south of Rome with a bust timing chain on the car. Got to be back at work by Monday but been here three nights already!

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